Fusion 360 Sketching Foundations

Learn how to create proper 2D sketches in Fusion 360. These foundational concepts will set you up for success in creating parametric models.

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Course curriculum

  • 1

    1. Introduction

    • Welcome

    • What you should know

    • Exercise files

    • Pre-Course Survey (required)

  • 3

    3. Overview of 2D Sketching

    • 2D sketch overview

    • Starting a sketch

  • 4

    4. Common Sketch Tools

    • Sketching Lines

    • Sketching Rectangles

    • Sketching Circles

    • Sketching Arcs

    • Sketching Points

    • Sketching Text

  • 5

    5. Sketch Concepts

    • Understanding design intent

    • Creating closed profiles

    • Using construction geometry

    • Making the most of the Sketch palette

  • 6

    6. Defining Sketches

    • Adding sketch dimensions

    • Automatic sketch constraints

    • Manually adding sketch constraints

    • Distinguish sketch constraints

    • Fully-defining sketches

    • Driven dimensions

  • 7

    7. Conclusion

    • Next Steps

Meet Your Instructor!

Kevin Kennedy

Product Designer and CAD Consultant

With more than 12 years of CAD experience, Kevin has brought products to market with notable companies such as Nikon, Sony, and Oracle, to name a few.

As an early adopter of Fusion 360, he quickly became recognized as an Autodesk Expert Elite member. He continues to contribute to the future of Fusion 360 by working closely with the product team. Many know him for his Fusion 360 tutorials, which have 3 million+ views on YouTube.

His premium courses combine cognitive science with years of design experience, resulting in concepts that stick. With students ranging from 8 to 80 years old, he's on a mission to make CAD education more accessible.

As a hobbyist woodworker, he enjoys designing and building custom furniture. With Fusion 360, Shaper Origin, and other digital fabrication tools, you'll find him pushing the boundaries of what it means to be a modern woodworker.